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Root Canal Therapy

Root Canal Therapy

Root Canal Therapy

Root canal treatment is a dental procedure that replaces a tooth’s damaged or infected pulp with a filling. The pulp consists of specialised dental cells, blood vessels, tissue fibres and some nerve fibres located in the hollow space in the central part of the tooth. The procedure is also known as endodontic treatment.

Success rates for endodontic treatment are generally good. About 90 to 95 per cent of patients who undergo root canal treatment can expect a functional tooth after the treatment. The treated tooth should last a very long time, provided that you maintain good oral hygiene and generally look after your teeth. Of course, no therapy or replacement will last as well as a healthy tooth.

Tooth anatomy

A tooth is mainly made of a hard material called dentine. Enamel is the surface layer that protects the visible part of the tooth (crown). The part of the tooth that sits beneath the gum line is called the root. The root is the ‘prong’ that helps anchor the tooth into the jaw. Generally, front teeth have only one root, while molars have several. There may be several root canals in one root.

The hollow centre of a tooth is called the pulp chamber. This area contains the blood vessels, nerves and pulp. The pulp is a sensitive tissue that provides oxygen, nutrients and feeling to the tooth. The main function of the dental pulp is to regulate the growth and development of the tooth during childhood. The pulp extends from the roof of the pulp chamber down into the bottom of each root canal.

Once the tooth is fully formed, nutrition for the tooth comes from the tissues surrounding the root. Therefore, a tooth can function without its pulp and, in the majority of cases, can be kept indefinitely. After endodontic treatment, the tooth is ‘pulpless’, but it is not a dead tooth.

Root canal procedure

You may need one or more visits to complete the endodontic treatment, depending on root canals in your tooth. The exact procedure chosen by your dentist may differ from the procedure outlined here. Ask your dentist for further information.

Generally, the typical root canal treatment includes:

  • The procedure is usually performed using local anaesthetic. If the pulp is infected, anaesthesia may not always be necessary because the tooth no longer has any feeling.
  • The affected tooth is wrapped in thin rubber (called a ‘rubber dam’) to prevent contamination of the root canals.
  • The decayed portions of the tooth and any affected filling are removed.
  • The pulp or pulp remnants are extracted.
  • The dentist uses a special drill and small instruments to thoroughly clean and shape the root canals and to remove bacteria, pus and debris. The root canals may need to be shaped or hollowed out to ensure a smooth interior surface.
  • The interior of the tooth is flushed with disinfectants and then dried.
  • If the root canal is not infection free, it may be medicated and the tooth sealed with a temporary filling material. You may have to wait a few weeks, or even months, before the pulp canal is filled. If the dentist feels bacteria are still present at your next appointment, the cleaning procedure may be repeated and the tooth once again packed with medication. This stage will continue until the dentist feels the tooth is free from bacteria.
  • The infection-free root canal is then sealed with long-lasting barrier materials (the root filling), usually a rubber-based material called ‘gutta-percha’.
  • The tooth then undergoes restoration and the biting surfaces need protection – an artificial biting surface for the tooth is fashioned out of regular filling material.
  • In many cases, where there is considerable loss of the tooth structure, there may be a need for an artificial crown made from porcelain or gold alloy or other materials.

In some complex cases, the dentist will refer you to an endodontist. Endodontists are dentists who are specialists in root canal treatment.
If specialist care is needed, your dentist will discuss this with you.

Root canal therapy can be an excellent alternative to tooth extraction for patients that are suitable to this procedure. Where a tooth is severely decayed or damaged, root canal therapy can be used to remove the infection and avoid extraction, your tooth is then typically covered with a crown. At King Street Dental in Murwillumbah, we champion restorative dentistry for its focus on helping patients keep their natural teeth as long as possible, and with improvements in technology, root canal therapy causes minimal discomfort and requires less recovery time than in the past.

If you would like an alternative to tooth extraction, speak to us today about this and other options in restorative dentistry available at our practice.

*source: Better Health Channel